What does it mean to "Build a Better Biome"?™


 

At Previlli™, it’s our mission to help every person “build a better biome.” What exactly do we mean by that?

In nature, a biome is a distinct community of living things that share the same terrain. Tropical rainforests, tundra, grasslands, deserts, and oceans are all examples of biomes. When scientists describe a biome, they consider three things: the population (who lives there?), the resources (what do they eat?) and the terrain (where do they live?). 


 You also have a biome inside your body. If you’re interested in gut health, you’ve probably heard the term “microbiome.” It refers to the microbes living inside your gut. While the makeup of your microbiome is hugely important, it’s just one piece of having a healthy biome.


When we say “biome,” we mean the whole package: 

  • The population: Who lives there?

  • The resources: What do they eat?

  • The terrain: Where do they live?

Population: Who lives there? 

 (The microbiome ecology)

A healthy gut biome has a balanced microbiome ecology. Balance is achieved in two ways. First, the microbiome ecology has high numbers of good bacteria, so they outnumber the bad. Second, the microbiome ecology has high diversity of good bacteria, so they deliver the benefits of multiple strains.

The resources: What do they eat? 

 (A healthy food source) 

A healthy gut biome also has the kind of food that the good gut bacteria love to eat. The more healthy food they have, the more their numbers increase. What do good gut bacteria love to eat? Prebiotics!

The terrain: Where do they live? 

(The core gut architecture)  

Finally, a healthy gut biome provides healthy terrain for good bacteria to thrive. That means having strong core gut architecture — the actual anatomy of the gut. Some of the core structures of the gut architecture include: gut surface area, gut mucin, gut barrier and lumen environment.

Beyond Priobiotics

Probiotics address the first element of a healthy gut biome, the microbiome ecology, because they introduce beneficial bacteria into the gut. Prebiotics address the second element of a healthy gut biome, a healthy food source, because good gut bacteria love to eat them. 


But what neither of these supplements consider is that without the third and most important element of a healthy biome — the core gut architecture — neither probiotics nor prebiotics will do much good. 


 Previlli™ is the only gut health supplement available that addresses all three elements of a healthy biome: the microbiome ecology, a healthy food source and the core gut architecture.

Meet the Structures of Your Gut

Your Gut Surface

The surface area of your gut is comprised of folds and hills and valleys. Tiny finger-like structures called villi and microvilli poke out of your gut wall, dramatically increasing its surface area. This gives your gut more space to absorb nutrients. In the colon, the villi and microvilli increase the absorptive area of the gut about 6.5 times. In the small intestine, they amplify it by 60-120 times! 

https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0192092 

The surface of the gut is critical to its proper function. The surface area can be damaged by poor diet, stress, illness and medications.

Your Gut Mucin

Mucin is a gelatinous carbohydrate that protects your gut lining and helps build your gut barrier. You want a nice, thick layer of mucin to keep your gut lining intact and the junctions of your gut barrier tight. Bonus: your gut mucin also promotes a healthy ratio of good-to-bad bacteria. 

The lining of the gut is covered in protective layers of mucus made from a gooey molecule called mucin.

Your Gut Barrier

Your gut barrier is the wall that stands between the contents of your gut and the rest of your body. It’s actually a trio of barricades: a physical barrier of interlocking cells called tight junctions; a biochemical barrier of chemical allies such as peptides, enzymes, and proteins; and an immunological barrier of antibodies and white blood cells.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6027178/ 

Epithelial cells of the gut barrier, mucus and gut bacteria.

Your Lumen Environment

Your gut’s inner sanctum, your lumen environment is the space inside your intestines. A lot goes on here, from moving waste along, to sensing pathogens, to overseeing communication between the gut and brain.

Source: PIXOLOGICSTUDIO/Science Photo Library/Getty Images 

The lumen environment is the interior of the gastrointestinal tract. Inside the lumen, a complex array of activities influence digestion, nutrient absorption, metabolism and microbiome ecology.

Unless these four structures of your gut are healthy, probiotics and prebiotics won’t do much good. That’s because without this essential foundation, good gut bacteria are unable to grow and flourish. 

Key Takeaways

  • In nature, a biome is a distinct community of living things that share the same terrain. 
  • Your microbiome is just the microbes living inside your gut. Your gut biome is the entire habitat of your gut. 
  • While the makeup of your microbiome is hugely important, it’s just one element of having a healthy gut biome. 
  • When we say “biome,” we mean the whole package: 1. The population (who lives there?), 2. The resources (what do the eat?), and 3. The terrain (where do they live?) 
  • A healthy gut biome has a balanced microbiome ecology, defined as high numbers and high diversity of good bacteria. 
  • A healthy gut biome also has the kind of food that the good gut bacteria love to eat (prebiotics). 
  • Finally, a healthy gut biome provides healthy terrain for good bacteria to thrive. That means having strong core gut architecture — the actual anatomy of the gut. 
  • Probiotics address the microbiome ecology. Prebiotics provide a healthy food source. But neither of these address the third and most important element of a healthy gut biome: the core gut architecture. 
  • Previlli™ is the only gut health supplement available that addresses all three elements of a healthy biome: the microbiome ecology, a healthy food source and the core gut architecture. 
  • Four crucial parts of your core gut architecture include your gut surface, gut mucin, gut barrier, and lumen environment. 
  • If these gut structures are not healthy, neither probiotics nor prebiotics will do much good.

References